Currently viewing the tag: "lists"

Two Cheers for Anarchism by James C. Scott: a great point about the true meaning of anarchism buried under economic wrongness and political timidity. Still somehow net quality, and see my Reason review for more details there. Maybe I was just excited to have a lefty-dude I can still recommend.

The Art of Being Free by Wendy McElroy: the woman who bridges the gap — hell, bothers mentioning the gap — between the Henry David Thoreau who sat in jail on principle and the one who said “the state was nowhere to be found” while picking berries; who also manages to be optimistic about the future while dubbing the U.S. a police state, break out the lesser-known libertarian heroes like R. C. Hoiles, and basically be a way better libertarian than most of us.

Female Chauvinist Pigs by Ariel Levy: holy 2004 panics, Batman! A slight book borrowed from friend’s bookshelf and read one insomniac night. Some fine points, truths, observations  buried under a screamingly anecdotal, panicky, judgmental  lefty-worried mess of writing. Levy is particularly judgmental towards sex workers, falling into the “nobody chooses that” trope. Indeed, anything where sex and money are remotely connected seems to worry her greatly. Meanwhile, the points that ring the most true for me were, say, comparisons between Jay Leno (who is let’s face it, very odd looking) and the gams-showing, cleavage-baring Katie Couric monster who filled in on for Leno on The Tonight Show. IE  am not as worried about people selling sex, period, as I am frustrated by the same jobs requiring different things from a man and a woman, namely the latter always needs to sexy while doing [it]. Bonus: felt slightly more guilty than usual for wanting to go on Red Eye so much after reading.

[Halfway through] Wrestling With Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took on New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City by Anthony Flint: Urban outrage never used to interest me, dad’s railing notwithstanding, until I realized just how God damned nasty people like Robert Moses were towards the poor, etc. No wonder dad was such a big fan of Jacobs’, and indeed interviewed her for Reason in 2001! (Dad also did an epic piece on Pittsburgh eminent domain in 2000.) Nevertheless, the writing quality of Flint is only so-so, and though I care, like economics, I have to read semi-slowly in order to get the proper details to care the proper way. Somehow, as much as I want to be Dad or Jim Epstein in my outrage for the downtrodden urban man, it does not come as easily as I wish. Mainly because they’re great at that sort of piece, and I am God damned lazy.

[Skimmed] Pledged: The Secret Life of Sororities by Alexandra Robbins: Another one from the bookshelf of the aforementioned friend. Flipped through and read bits here and there tonight/today. Not nearly interesting a subject to be interesting, not trashy enough to be really worth savoring. Especially not after the numerous episodes of Degrassi this household has watched in the last few weeks. It felt tame, but angsty, but not relatable angsty. Bonus: need to shame friend further for having read this instead of Hitch-22 when she received both for last year’s Christmas. Other thought: Alexandra Robbins, sure, you count as an “investigative reporter” for doing this, but something about this is so rom-com that I cannot take it seriously. You just cannot be not played by Kate Hudson in the movie in my head. Ugh.

[Begun] A War of Nerves: Soldiers and Psychiatrists in the 20th Century by Ben Shepard: It’s from 2003, I have read 20 pages, and I already feel like it’s judging me for having a “fashionable” interest in the subject of shell-shock thanks to the amazing ’90s novel Regeneration by Pat Barker. And holy hell, I need to read more fiction, eh? Nevertheless, fascinating subject. I feel like a horrible person when I say this, but it’s a relief in some ways that so many people respond so poorly to warfare. Because if that doesn’t fuck you up, what should? And indeed, if humans react so badly to being put in that situation, doesn’t that bode well for us as a species, just a bit?

pulpy pulp
  • New York Times op-ed doc on Chris Williams of Montana Cannabis  who is facing 80 years in prison. Another Montana Cannabis co-owner, Richard Flor, died in prison in August, a few months into his five-year term.
  • “Police were forced to shoot a dog” during a narcotics SWAT search warrant on a house which contained an infant. Comforting! 
  • Michael Moynihan says everyone’s a big fat liar, not just Republicans.
  • Sometimes I wonder if Cosmo isn’t better than Esquire, just because Cosmodoesn’t think women have ever heard of politics and therefore nobody ever writes shit like this for Cosmo.
  • Winner and finalists for the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography are worth a look. 
  • Football is boring, but a little bad-ass girl playing it with boys is worth a look.
  • Britain is awfully bureaucratic about contacting aliens.
  • Ron Paul Elected Ruler of Tiny Planet Inhabited by 1 Billion Tiny Ron Pauls” 
  • DEA responds to Reason re marijuana legalization victories, suggests they’ll keep right on being dicks, no matter the state law.
  • Mother Jones offers a more hopeful spin on legalization, noting that Eric Holder didn’t officially come out in opposition to Colorado’s Amendment 64.
  • Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) has all your marijuana results from last night.
  • Ben Smith makes me cringe — in spite of the awesome marriage equality and marijuana legalization victories from last night — by deciding last night means “Welcome to Liberal America.”
  • Obama’s victory tweet is the most popular tweet of all time, and I was totally rooting for Justin Beiber there.
  • I hate weddings, and this is still insanely touching. Photography is awesome.
  • Except when it’s campaign photography, then the magic is pretty much beaten out of the medium.

“Where Eagles Dare” by the Misfits; urge to: pump fist and poorly hardcore dance while screaming: “I ain’t no God damn son of a bitch!”.

-”Copperhead Road” by Steve Earle; need to: put fist in air in manner of fratty guy or hipster, both of whom sincerely adore “Don’t Stop Believing” but you hate that song. Flail extra from “they draft the white trash first round here anyway” line until end, scream “now the DEA’s got a chopper in the air!”

“Carry Me Back to Virginia” by Old Crow Medicine Show; must: do some sort of flat-footing while moshing and thinking about poor Confederate soldiers.

“Drunken Lullabies”  by Flogging Molly; used to while restless at age 15-17: actually run into walls of house, closet doors, due to lack of available mosh pit.

“Harlem River Blues” by Justin Townes Earle; you: wave your arms, clap, walk around and generally feel the gospel spirit, which is weird since the song is about committing suicide.

“Oh, Susquehanna” by Defiance Ohio; just: mosh with killingly folk punk earnestness, especially when the girl starts singing.

“Teenagers” by My Chemical Romance; unashamedly: bounce like the mallpunk you never were, even if you technically saw them open for Green Day in 2005, but didn’t pay a lot of attention.

“I Wanna Dance With Somebody” by Whitney Houston; dance; for two thirds of the song, get kind of bored, think about how sweet Whitney’s eye makeup is in the video.

“You Ain’t Woman Enough To Take My Man” by Loretta Lynn; country-slink a bit: think about numerous unavailable men who are attractive, apologize in your mind to Loretta.

“Calamity Song” by the Decemberists; sit up straight; write a few bracing words in a Microsoft Word doc because of that excellent beginning, nod because you are just so pumped for your montage of productivity, even if this song seems to be about the end of the world.

“Suffragette City” by David Bowie; dance, using more hips and shoulders than usual: repeat the words you know which are “hey, man” and “suffragette city!” and don’t forget “wham, bam, thank you ma’am.”

“Riot Squad” by Cock Sparrer; he’s in the riot squad: ooooooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhh.

-etc.

-etc.