Currently viewing the tag: "war"

A libertarian panel hosted by Lucy Steigerwald, where ranting is encouraged, and smashing the state is mandatory.

-Lucy Steigerwald: Columnist for VICE.com, Antiwar.com, Rare.us, and Editor in Chief of The Stag Blog; @lucystag

-Joe Steigerwald: Publisher for The Stag Blog, technical dude; @steigerwaldino

-Michelle Montalvo: Perpetual intern, sci-fi enthusiast, technical failure; @michellePHL

-Adam Berkeley: libertarian-sympathetic friend who knows foreign policy and hates DC.

-M.K. Lords; editor at Bitcoin Not Bombs, writer for various bitcoin and anarchists sites, firedancer, poet; @mklords

Our cranky, liberty-loving panel discussed warmongers, necons, Israel, and other depressing news of the day, then wrapped it up with a comic chat about the impending death of Archie, and the new female status of Thor.

ob2James Kunstler is a brick-throwing leftie, but he’s had it with Barack Obama, the dissappointer in chief:

“Barack Obama, who I voted for twice, is on his way to becoming the worst US president in my lifetime, at least — and maybe in the whole cavalcade going back to the very start of the republic. I don’t want to get too sidetracked in this brief blog space today, but isn’t it stupendously asinine that Mr. Obama’s Justice Department and his SEC appointees only just last week became interested in the pervasive swindle of high frequency trading on Wall Street after author Michael Lewis went on 60 Minutes. Like, they hadn’t heard about this years-long orgy of front-running until now? Strange to relate, I actually might feel more comfortable if Vladimir Putin was massing troops on the Mexican side of the US border to keep Americans safe from our own bungling and destructive government.”

Thirty years ago Ronald Reagan disappointed me because he gave speeches like a libertarian but governed like a practical politician and didn’t do much of anything to reduce the size and scope of the federales, no matter what his followers say today.

Obama must be a huge disappointment to progressives and true believers like Kunstler (not the moronic masses who blindly voted).

After almost six years Obama has shown he was nothing but an attractive Chicago-style pol with the right skin color who could write nice speeches and read a TelePrompter real good.

Instead of bringing a socialist paradise to America, which is what his followers and haters both thought he would do, he’s just screwing up healthcare stuff and still doing evil military and financial stuff that any Republican could do.

Maybe it’ll be Obama who brings us the WWIII everyone thought RR was going to bring us by doing something stupid in Ukraine (this time, unlike Syria, he won’t have Putin around to save his intervening ass).

He’s proved, for those who are paying attention, that there is no difference between the Republicans and Democrats who go to Washington.  Both parties suck for the same reason — they’re in it to get more power over us, not for freeing us up and leaving us alone.

To boot, and for the benefit of all, and I hope but I’m not counting on it, Obama’s made it impossible for any openly Big Government guy to get elected again.

He did the whole country and future generations a favor by botching health care because now no politician like Hillary who wants to be prez will ever dare to approach the subject of national single-payer healthcare. Half-assed federal healthcare, as we see, is awful enough.

Obama, bless him, has betrayed the “promise” of national healthcare and given it the third rail it didn’t have before.

  • Sen. Rand Paul might not heroically prevent a war with Syria. He may not even filibuster. But something I do appreciate — and which echoes his dear old dad´s foreign policy ideas — is how he stresses that we do not know what will happen if the US intervenes. And that ¨our¨ intervention could indeed make things worse. Insert Hayek quote about arrogant, imagined knowledge of certain folks here.
  • Paul also writes in Time, ¨The burden of proof lies with those who wish to engage in war.¨ If only that ended up being true in practice (instead of just true in the actual sense), and if that worked out for every law and government meddle.
  • I love Conor Fridersdorf, I do. It´s strange how he is too moderate a libertarian for me, yet he is doing so much more for the cause, as it were, than all the — well, other folks. Insular, ranting folks who call TSA agents ¨pedophiles¨ and then call that a blog post.
  • John Glaser on how we just don´t know how many people died in the Syrian chemical weapons attack. (Body counts are notoriously shifty, especially initially. I can picture a headline that said 25 dead at Columbine, and I seem to remember initial 9/11 counts hitting 10,000.)
  • Michael C. Moynihan on the war in Syria as compared to the Spanish Civil War — everyone needs to weigh in! Great ending line.
  • The VICE columns that go viral keep being the ones I am least satisfied with. This is terrible reinforcement for me — like all those A-grades in college that I wouldn´t have given me. (B in Dr. Cooley´s darkroom photography class on the other hand, that was a real, earned grade, dammit.) Still, I wrote about cops on camera and how the DEA continues to suck, so you can read about that over here.
  • I was on Guillermo Jimenez´s radio show last week. Jimenez is a super-radical, friendly dude. And I love that all of the ads on his show seem to be about hording gold or what have you. We talked about Syria, cops, the importance of ¨Suspect Device,¨ and other state-smashing topics.
  • Rachel Maddow is pathetically soft on Obama here — love the heaps of benefit of the doubt he is given by default — but I enjoy her conclusions on how little we need to hear from the makers of the war in Iraq. 
  • See, this is why lefties love pictures of people holding up hand-written expressions of a sentiment to which they subscribe — it´s touching and heart-warming! I see that now! (Admittedly, I did go ¨I am Bradley Manning¨ two years ago. And my heart was actually warmed by this tumblr.)
  • The fact that the patriarch even grew a mullet… Should we make hipster jokes? Canada jokes? I can´t decide how to react to this.
  • Pokey LaFarge is coming to Pittsburgh on September 24, so ideally all of you stalkers will known where to find me on that day. (Don´t do that.) Pokey is one of those folks who just didn´t click until I saw him and his band nearly overshadow Old Crow Medicine Show (albeit the one that is sans Willie Watson) this New Years Eve in Nashville.
  • Sometimes I think about emailing Harry Cheadle at VICE and pitching him a story where I enroll in the Miss Mothman Pageant. But then I come to my senses. As amazing as the name is, the pageant really doesn´t seem to be trying to live up to its namesake. If you´re going for a set beauty standard, at least pick girls with gray skin and large red eyes who are at least 8 feet tall.
  • Speaking of which — sort of — here are two of my favorite, honestly creepy Fortean Times pieces. One is on the legend of ¨Lost Cosmonauts¨ and the other is one ¨The Dyatlov Pass Incident.¨ Creepiness in the Soviet Union! Not just for stuff we know definitely occurred!

Today´s video can only be Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds with ¨More News From Nowhere.¨

I always forget that in the world there exists at least one 7´56 song that doesn´t feel endless.

Memorial Day is now three days behind us. The patriotic fervor of the day has dulled to a low ebb. Citizens, more distant than ever from the military, can once again forget about the soldiers dying far away. For most Americans it’s time to go back to their daily grind until the shadow of Veterans Day reminds them to wave flags and post thank yous on social media.

As for libertarians, it’s downright antithetical to celebrate a day like Memorial Day, so it’s a relief when the day passes. The idea of memorializing soldiers, the guns in the itchy trigger fingers of the State’s hand, seems loathsome. These are the people who kill enemy and innocents alike, unquestioning, based on orders given by men who view battlefields as chessboards, soldiers as pawns, and blood as a lubricant in their geopolitical ends and means.

Over on AntiWar.com, Lucy Steigerwald (my sister) writes in her critique of Memorial Day that “It is not morally neutral to join the military, and so it’s not morally neutral to mourn war dead.” Sheldon Richman at the Free Association blog also views Memorial Day in a negative light, (to say the least).

Richman writes:

Today is Revisionist History Day, what others call Memorial Day. Americans are supposed to remember the country’s war dead while being thankful that they protected our freedom and served our country. However, reading revisionist history … teaches that the fallen were doing no such thing. Rather they were and are today serving cynical politicians and the “private” component of the military-industrial complex in the service of the American Empire.

But this ignores the millions of soldiers killed who were drafted in the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. They didn’t choose to join the military, they were coerced. It also ignores the fact that the world only exists in its current capacity because of the blood spilled in the American Revolution. Was that war just? What about World War II? How many civilians have to be killed before some kind of intervention becomes necessary or moral?

You don’t have to believe in the morality of war to honor those who died. But by all means parse out each individual soldier. Play St. Peter and judge them on their worthiness of being honored. Go ahead and memorialize the 53 percent that meets your criteria while making sure none of the 47 percent receive any of your well-wishes. If you want to find someone to blame, there’s a much more worthy target than soldiers — especially the dead ones.

The blame for wars lies squarely at the feet of the government. It’s easy to excoriate soldiers for being the weapons of war, but that ignores the fingers pulling the trigger. With drones replacing front line soldiers, the impetus to change the way our government operates grows exponentially. When war becomes as cold and sterile as playing a video game, it doesn’t bode well for a peaceful world.

You cannot hope to put an end to warfare by heaping blame on the soldiers. It’s counterproductive and only inflames the passions of the citizenry. To spur change, our words and efforts have to be focused on the highest halls of power. The State will try and deflect, to blame the rest of the world for forcing their hand, for coercing them into war. It will arouse patriotism through statues and songs and through co-opting days of memorial.

It is far too easy to get caught up in celebrating Memorial Day the way the government wants us to. They want us to forget the endless wars, the needless interventions. But that’s not the point. Memorial Day wasn’t started by the government as a way to stoke patriotism. It was a simple day of remembering those who died in battle, no matter who or why.

Memorial Day isn’t a once a year quote thanking the military for their service. It’s not an excuse to wave a flag and proclaim our country the greatest in the world. It’s not an excuse to hate anti-war activists and those who would dare speak out against our foreign policy. The State has equated the day with patriotism to dull the senses of the masses. To cow those who would speak out against the heroic American solider serving selflessly overseas to protect our freedoms, Democracy; whatever the buzz words of the day are. But that’s not what Memorial Day is for.

It is a day to honor American soldiers who have died in battle. That’s all.

It’s really that simple. There’s nothing pro-war or pro-government about it. If anything, the concept of remembering the hundreds of thousands of dead American soldiers is decidedly anti-war. If more people remember the cost of war in human terms then it becomes harder for the government to abuse its powers.

The government may have stolen Memorial Day for their own means, but that doesn’t mean remembering the fallen should make us uncomfortable. Remember that as long as government has the power of life and death, there will be more and more soldiers who die and become merely statistics in a book. So celebrate Memorial Day, and remember the soldiers — maybe more than once a year — but do more than that; fight for a world in which they no longer have to be memorialized.

As you might know, Sen. Rand Paul, that curly-haired moppet from Kentucky, has been filibustering the nomination of would-be CIA director John Brennan for more than four hours now. In his quest to get Attorney General Eric Holder to say that no drone strikes can be used on American citizens on our soul, he has been backed by GOP Sens. Mike Lee and Ted Cruz, and Democrat Sen. Ron Wyden. Rand has quoted Lysander Spooner, Friederich Hayek, flirted with, but then unGodwin’d just in time, by dropping some nuance re Hitler comparisons (currency run amok and the dangers of democracy, it’s okay, folks).

Here are some important sources for all your questions, such as, why is CSPAN suddenly so interesting — why is government suddenly so interesting?